The Importance of Cleaning Window Weep Holes

Dated: 09/25/2018

Views: 32

Autumn is here, and that means more chances of inclement weather.  One important aspect of autumn home maintenance involves checking up on your dwelling’s window weep holes.

 

What are window weep holes?  They are a critical window design feature, customarily found at the exterior of the frame, and are also recognized as a window’s “weep” drainage system.  Window weep holes are strategically placed to drain water – from condensation moisture, rain, or melted frost and snow – out of your window.  Their main purpose thereby is to permit water to drain from the interior to the exterior of the window’s frame.  Having properly working window weep holes tremendously helps in minimizing water damage and costly service repairs.  This is especially true if you have storm windows in place – simply because those weep holes are relied upon to expel the moisture accumulating between the storm window and primary window.

 

How do window weep holes work?  First remember that water tends to flow towards gravity, or downhill.  Hence, window weep holes are situated in such a way to collect, hold, and then drain the water that is running off your windows and then direct or channel that water away from the house so that it does not drip into your home.  Window weep holes in general have three main parts or sections:  a sill or track that collects the water, a one-way valve, and small flaps that cover the openings.  When water accumulates in the window weep holes’ sill or track, that same water builds up enough pressure to open the one-way valve.  Next, the flaps open until the water drains, then they close up again to prevent wind and insects from entering the gap.

And, just like other aspects of your home, window weep holes require maintenance as well.  Window weep holes, for one, must be kept clear.  Similarly, care must be taken to ensure that no caulking or exterior siding is covering up or blocking the window weep holes.  Then, too, their openings should be kept clean. 

 

Why must window weep holes be kept clean and clear?  If they are not kept clean and clear, water will build up and leak into your house, causing potential damage – like wall rot, window rot, and mold – inside your home as the water backs up and then drains into your dwelling place rather than outwardly.  As a result, it is imperative to regularly check that no dirt, dust, mold, grime, sand from a coastal region, twigs, straw, decomposing bugs and critters, evergreen needles, deciduous tree leaves, or any type of debris is blocking or clogging up the window weep holes’ drainage. 

 

For the proper maintenance of your window weep holes, check that there are no obstructions.  Use a soft-bristled brush, a crevice tool like a small screwdriver, a toothpick, can of compressed air, or even a vacuum to remove the debris that builds up, especially on the sill or track.  When cleaning, do so gently so that the window weep holes’ flaps won’t be damaged.  And, when excessive rain is expected, that would be a prime opportunity to inspect and clean your window weep holes ahead of time.

Latest Blog Posts

8 Autumn Flowers to Plant in Your Garden for Curb Appeal

Curb appeal is important no matter what month or season it is.  And, with autumn’s browning foliage and clutter of leaves, home sellers are mindful of making a good first impression.;

Read More

The Importance of Cleaning Window Weep Holes

Autumn is here, and that means more chances of inclement weather.  One important aspect of autumn home maintenance involves checking up on your dwelling’s window weep holes. What are

Read More

Experience French Culture in San Diego’s North Park Community

Experience French Culture in San Diego’s North Park Community North Park is a beautifully vibrant San Diego hamlet.  It has ranked in the top 20 Hippest Hipster Neighborhoods of the

Read More

5 Cost-Effective Green Home Renovations

Have certified home energy auditors evaluate your residence.  The United States Department of Energy defines a home energy audit as “the first step to assess how much energy your home

Read More